The Balance Project: Favorite Interviews

November 21, 2017

163 interviews. 163 perspectives on work-life balance. 163 favorites.
But which interviews have been the most viewed? The most popular?
The ones people always ask me about?
Here are the top 12 since the series started in January 2014, in no particular order,
with an excerpt from each.
Click on the interviewee’s name to see her whole interview.
Which one is your favorite?

 

Reese Witherspoon: Actor/Producer (interview #100)
No one has it all. No one. Even if it looks that way from the outside.
You do the best you can and try and not worry (haha)!… and
I love this project. Women should share their stories so we all feel more connected…
And so we know we aren’t alone.

 

Reshma Saujani: Founder of Girls Who Code (interview #150)
I’m getting better at realizing that everything I’ve read is wrong and I have to write my own playbook and my own rules. My own rules are constantly evolving as I continue to grow, learn, and get better.

 

Jenné Claiborne: Vegan Chef and Founder of Sweet Potato Soul (interview #155)
I think “having it all” is a mindset. I feel wealthy, successful, loved, and healthy when I am living from gratitude. However, when I start to think of all of the things I still want, I definitely don’t feel like I have it all. It’s all a matter of perspective, and the grass is always greener on the other side.

 

Sara Blakely: Founder of SPANX (interview #112)
I was at a cocktail party and told a group of people that I had a life motto I live by. However, when someone asked me what it was, I forgot it. My husband thought that was so hilarious he actually had a neon sign made and installed in our house while I was away. It says… “I have a life motto, but I forgot it.” My motto (that I eventually remembered) is: “The more you experience in life the more you have to offer others.”

 

Kimra Luna: Branding Strategist (interview #115)
Throw value around like confetti.

 

Sarah Michelle Gellar, Actor, Producer and Founder of Foodstirs (interview #158)
The most important lesson I have learned is that it takes a village.
It took me a long time to accept that I can’t and shouldn’t do everything myself.
Asking for help is not a sign of weakness but actually a sign of strength.

 

Lisa Sugar: Founder and Editor in Chief, POPSUGAR (interview #106)
Having it all means something different to everyone, but overall I think its overrated, unrealistic,
and unfair of ourselves to strive for this. Have what makes you feel happy and complete,
but don’t drive yourself crazy in the process.

 

Georgene Huang, Founder of Fairygodboss (interview #121)
Small adjustments happen all the time because balance is not a static state (of mind).
Balance depends on what needs and demands you and others around you are placing on yourself at any given time. Sometimes there are very large adjustments, e.g. when you start a company or have a baby.
But sometimes the adjustments are literally seasonal. For example, think about how balance looks/feels during the Christmas season. Just thinking about it makes me feel a bit tired.

 

 

Carly Zakin and Danielle Weisberg: Founders of theSkimm (interview #89)
When we started theSkimm, we had zero work-life balance. We worked around the clock to get the company off the ground. And it was necessary. Although we still have crazy schedules, we have adjusted our schedules so that there are clear work and clear non-work times. It’s not easy but it’s necessary. The company won’t survive unless we are functioning people and to do that, we need to have perspective.

 

 

Bianna Golodryga: Television Journalist (interview #153)
What does “having it all” even mean, really? There will never be a time where I feel that I’ve committed myself 100% to all of my responsibilities or goals, but I strive for it everyday. The challenge itself can prove to be rewarding, especially if surrounded by an encouraging support system.

 

 

Samantha Ettus: Balance Expert, Author, TV/Radio Personality (interview #36)
Nobody has it all—Barack Obama, Jennifer Aniston. So why would anyone strive for an unattainable goal? Instead I encourage women to focus on redesigning their lives to fit all of their priorities. A delicious life is comprised of professional and personal fulfillment, and I know that we can all achieve that.

 

 

Latham Thomas: Entrepreneur, Doula, Founder of Mama Glow and The Ritualista (interview #161)
I believe you can have it all, you just need to know what it “all” is. What is it that you truly want?
I don’t think happiness is underrated, but “being realistic” is overrated.
I don’t want anyone to tell me what’s possible or damper my dreams or drown my aspirations by their limited experience or lack of faith. Being realistic is often times an excuse
for people to play small and avoid taking the risks that would propel them forward in personal growth.
It’s all about figuring out what you truly want,
not what you think people want for you, but what your soul truly desires—what is it?

 

Related Posts
The Balance Project novel
The Balance Project Interview Series

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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